TalantaAntigua, May 13, 2017: The fleet enjoyed beautiful conditions for the first day and night of the Antigua Bermuda Race. A light easterly breeze of about 8 knots and a gentle sea state provided glorious reaching conditions. By morning on the second day, all of the fleet had passed Barbuda - the next land they will see will be Bermuda, over 800 miles north. The wind experienced was more than forecast and this may allow the faster yachts to hook into good pressure further north. The slower yachts might miss the lift in pressure as it goes east away from the race track. The phrase 'rich get richer' would be an apt comment for the leading boats in the Antigua Bermuda Race. However to reach the rich pickings to the north, the fleet need to cross an area of little wind.

At 0900 ADT on Day Two, the Nigel Irens-designed catamaran, Allegra, of the St. Moritz Sailing Club was 800 miles from Bermuda. Watch Captain, Paul Larsen contacted the media team via satellite just before sundown on Day One:

“The view from the nav. office right here, right now is pretty damned nice! The Caribbean sun is closing fast on the horizon to my left and setting over the very low shores of the island of Barbuda. There is a slight swell, but it's comfortable. Scotty is doing some last checks around the deck before darkness sets in. Behind me, Rick is preparing a steak dinner. Everything is golden on board Allegra! We are making about 8.5 knots across this painting and we're grateful for every one of them,” says world speed sailing record holder, Paul Larsen in his blog from on board.

Spirit of BermudaOrganized by The Royal Bermuda Yacht Club in association with Antigua Sailing Week

Antigua, May 12, 2017: The inaugural 935 nautical mile Antigua Bermuda Race started on time with the entire fleet getting away without a hitch. A light southerly breeze of 10 knots and warm Antiguan sunshine provided perfect conditions. The variety pack of 21 yachts is an eclectic collection, both in terms of crew and craft. From the majestic schooner, Eleonora to the pocket rocket Pogo 12.50s, and just about everything in between. The fleet includes ocean racers; new and old, as well as bluewater cruisers raced by passionate corinthians. The entire fleet started together and the Antigua Bermuda Race was born.

In the first hour of the race, American Volvo 70, Warrior, skippered by Stephen Murray Jr. had opened up a two mile lead on the chasing Swans, Don Macpherson's Swan 90, Freya and British Swan 82, Stay Calm. The breeze then backed to the east putting the fleet on a beam reach. Freya unleashed their gigantic masthead Code Zero to flash past Warrior who had forsaken their Code Zero and J1 to reduce their rating. Underpowered, Warrior was no match for the additional sail area and waterline length of Freya. Swan 82, Stay Calm was going well and estimated to be leading the race after time correction, for both IRC and CSA, but there is a long way to go. Simon & Nancy De Pietro's Irish CNB 76, Lilla was revelling in the reaching conditions and also going extremely well.